Civic engagement is changing: new venues of public participation are arising out of the development and mass-availability of new mobile technologies and social media; new practices of governance and democratic discourse are becoming possible with the mass collection and representation of data; new interaction design practices are emerging from working directly in public and community settings. The present fascination with data and with the distributed tools for collecting, representing, and analyzing data create a mess of new opportunities and challenges for designing mobile computing and digital media artifacts that support community and civic and engagement.

I am an Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech; I study community participation and community design practice.

I established the Participatory Publics Lab – PPL – at Georgia Tech in order to work with students and community members to design and deploy new mobile and digital media. Together, we build richly interactive and data-driven websites, mobile apps, and analytic tools that support collective action through community and civic engagement. We do this through the practice of participatory design where community members are integral to the design process: co-creating new artifacts and technical forms to assert identity, contending with local issues, and responding to community emotions, beliefs, and desires. The research and design projects I run are based in local communities and neighborhoods with active partnerships with the City of Atlanta, and neighborhoods surrounding the Georgia Tech campus.

My research touches a number of different domains, including: Human-Computer Interaction, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Social Computing, Urban Informatics, Science and Technology Studies, Participatory Design, Design Research.